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I am a professional Day Trader working for a Prop Fund, Hope I can help people out and answer some questions

Howdy all, I work professionally for a proprietary trading fund, and have worked for quite a few in my time, hope I can offer some insights on trading etc you guys might have.
Bonus for you guys
Here are the columns in my trading journal and various explanations where appropriate:
Trade Number – Simply is this the first trade of the year? The 10th?, The 50th? I count a trade
that you opened and closed just one trade number. For example if you buy EUUSD today and
sell it 50 pips later in the day and close out the trade, then that is just one trade for recording
purposes. I do not create a second trade number to describe the exit. Both the entry and exit are
under the same trade number.


Ticket Number – This is ticket number / order ID number that your broker gives you for the trade
on your platform.


Day of the Week – This would be simply the day of the week the trade was initiated


Financial Instrument / Currency Pair – Whatever Financial Instrument or currency pair you are
trading. If you are trading EUUSD, put EUUSD. If you are trading the EuroFX futures
contract, then put in Euro FX. If you are trading the emini S&P, then put in Emini S&P 500. If
you are trading a stock, put in the ticker symbol. Etc.


Buy/Sell or Long/Short – Did you buy or sell to open the new trade? If you bought something to
open the trade, then write in either BUY or LONG. If you sold(shorted) something to open a
trade, then write in SOLD, or SHORT. This is a personal preference. Some people like to put in
their journals as BUY/SELL. Other people like to write in Long/Short. My preference is for
writing in long/short, since that is the more professional way to say it. I like to use the lingo
where possible.


Order Type – Market or Limit – When you entered the trade was it a market order or limit order?
Some people can enter a trade using a combination of market and limit orders. If you enter a
trade for $1 million half of which was market order and the other half was limit order, then you
can write in $500,000 Market, $500,000 Limit as a bullet points.


Position Size / Units / Contracts / Shares – How big was the total trade you entered? If you
bought 1 standard lot of a currency pair, then write in $100,000 or 1 standard lot. If you bought 5
gold futures contracts, then write in 5 contracts. If you bought 1,000 shares of stock, then write
in 1,000 shares. Etc.


Entry Price – The entry price you received entering your opening position. If you entered at
multiple prices, then you can either write in all the different fills you got, or specify the average
price received.


Entry Date – Date that you entered the position. For example January 23, 2012. Or you can
write in 1/23/12

.
Entry Time – Time that you opened the position. If it is multiple positions, then you can specify
each time for each various fill, or you can specify the time range. For example if you got
$100,000 worth of EUUSD filled at 3:00 AM EST, and another $100,000 filled at 3:05 and
another $100,000 filled at 3:25, then you can write all those in, or you can specify a range of 3:00
– 3:30 AM EST.


Entry Spread Cost (in pips) – This is optional if you want to keep track of your spread cost in
pips. If you executed a market order, how many pips did you pay in spread.


Entry Spread Cost (in dollars) – This is optional if you want to keep track of your spread cost in
dollars. If you executed a market order, how many dollars did you pay in spread.


Stop Loss Size – How big is your stop loss size? If you are trading a currency pair, then you
write in the pips. If you are trading the S&P futures contract, then write in the number of points.
If you are trading a stock, then write in how many cents or dollars your stop is away from your
entry price.


% Risk – If you were to get stopped out of the trade, how much % loss of your equity is that?
This is where you input your risk per trade expressed in % terms if you use such a position sizing
method. If you risked 0.50% of your account on the trade, then put in 0.50%


Risk in dollars – If you were to get stopped out of the trade, how much loss in dollars is that. For
example if you have a $100,000 account and you risked 1% on a trade, then write in $1,000
dollars


Potential Reward: Risk Ratio – This is a column that I only sometimes fill in. You write in what
the potential reward risk ratio of the trade is. If you are trading using a 100 pip stop and you
expect that the market can reasonably move 300 pips, then you can write in 3:1. Of course this is
an interesting column because you can look at it after the trade is finished and see how close you
were or how far removed from reality your initial projections were.


Potential Win Rate – This is another column that I only sometimes fill in. You write in what you
believe the potential win rate of this trade is. If you were to place this trade 10 times in a row,
how many times do you think you would win? I write it in as percentage terms. If you believe
the trade has a 50% chance to win, then write in 50%.


Type of Inefficiency – This is where you write in what type of inefficiency you are looking to
capture. I use the word inefficiency here. I believe it is important to think of trading setups as
inefficiencies. If you think in terms of inefficiencies, then you will think in terms of the market
being mispriced, then you will think about the reasons why the market is mispriced and why such
market expectations for example are out of alignment with reality. In this category I could write
in different types of trades such as fading the stops, different types of news trades, expecting
stops to get tripped, betting on sentiment intensifying, betting on sentiment reversing, etc. I do
not write in all the reasons why I took the trade in this column. I do that in another column. This
column is just to broadly define what type of inefficiency you are looking to capture.


Chart Time Frame – I do not use this since all my order flow based trades have nothing to do
with what chart time frame I look at. However, if you are a chartist or price action trader, then
you may want to include what chart time frame you found whatever pattern you were looking at.


Exit Price – When you exit your trade, you enter the price you received here.


Exit Date – The date you exited your trade.


Exit Time – The time you exited your trade.


Trade Duration – In hours, minutes, days or weeks. If the trade lasts less than an hour, I will
usually write in the duration in minutes. Anything in between 1 and 48 hours, I write in the hours
amount. Anything past that and I write it as days or weeks as appropriate, etc.
Pips the trade went against you before turning into a winner – If you have a trade that suffered a
draw down, but did not stop you out and eventually was a winner, then you write it how many
pips the trade went against you before it turned into a profitable trade. The reason you have this
column is to compare it to your stop loss size and see any patterns that emerge. If you notice that
a lot of your winning trades suffer a big draw down and get near your stop loss points but turn out
to be a profitable trade, then you can further refine your entry strategy to get in a better price.


Slippage on the Exit – If you get stopped out for a loss, then you write in how many pips you
suffered as slippage, if any. For example if you are long EUUSD at 1.2500 and have your stop
loss at 1.2400 and the market drops and you get filled at 1.2398, then you would write in -2 pips
slippage. In other words you lost 2 pips as slippage. This is important for a few different
reasons. Firstly, you want to see if the places you put your stop at suffer from slippage. If they
do, perhaps you can get better stop loss placement, or use it as useful information to find new
inefficiencies. Secondly, you want to see how much slippage your broker is giving you. If you
are trading the same system with different brokers, then you can record the slippage from each
one and see which has the lowest slippage so you can choose them.


Profit/Loss -You write in the profit and/or loss in pips, cents, points, etc as appropriate. If you
bought EUUSD at 1.2500 and sell it at 1.2550, you made 50 pips, so write in +50 pips. If you
bought a stock at $50 and you sell it at $60, then write in +$10. If you buy the S&P futures at
1,250 and sell them at 1,275, then write in +25 points. If you buy the GBP/USD at 1.5000 and
you sell it at 1.4900, then write in -100 pips. Etc. I color code the box background to green for
profit and red for loss.


Profit/Loss In Dollars – You write the profit and/or loss in dollars (or euros, or jpy, etc whatever
currency your account is denominated in). If you are long $100,000 of EUUSD at 1.2500 and
sell it at 1.2600, then write in +$1,000. If you are short $100,000 GBP/USD at 1.5900 and it
rises to 1.6000 and you cover, then write in -$1,000. I color code the box background to green
for profit and red for loss.


Profit/Loss as % of your account – Write in the profit and/or loss as % of your account. If a trade
made you 2% of your account, then write in +2%. If a trade lost 0.50%, then write in -0.50%. I
color code the box background to green for profit and red for loss.


Reward:Risk Ratio or R multiple: If the trade is a profit, then write in how many times your risk
did it pay off. If you risked 0.50% and you made 1.00%, then write in +2R or 2:1 or 2.0. If you
risked 0.50% and a trade only makes 0.10%, then write in +0.20R or 0.2:1 or 0.2. If a trade went
for a loss that is equal to or less than what you risked, then I do not write in anything. If the loss
is greater than the amount you risked, then I do write it in this column. For example lets say you
risk 0.50% on a stock, but overnight the market gaps and you lose 1.50% on a trade, then I would
write it in as a -3R.


What Type of trading loss if the trade lost money? – This is where I describe in very general
terms a trade if it lost money. For example, if I lost money on a trade and the reason was because
I was buying in a market that was making fresh lows, but after I bought the market kept on going
lower, then I would write in: “trying to pick a bottom.” If I tried shorting into a rising uptrend
and I take a loss, then I describe it as “trying to pick a top.” If I am buying in an uptrend and buy
on a retracement, but the market makes a deeper retracement or trend change, then I write in
“tried to buy a ret.” And so on and so forth. In very general terms I describe it. The various
ways I use are:
• Trying to pick a bottom
• Trying to pick a top
• Shorting a bottom
• Buying a top
• Shorting a ret and failed
• Wrongly predicted news
• Bought a ret and failed
• Fade a resistance level
• Buy a support level
• Tried to buy a breakout higher
• Tried to short a breakout lower
I find this category very interesting and important because when performing trade journal
analysis, you can notice trends when you have winners or losing trades. For example if I notice a
string of losing trades and I notice that all of them occur in the same market, and all of them have
as a reason: “tried to pick a bottom”, then I know I was dumb for trying to pick a bottom five
times in a row. I was fighting the macro order flow and it was dumb. Or if I notice a string of
losers and see that I tried to buy a breakout and it failed five times in a row, but notice that the
market continued to go higher after I was stopped out, then I realize that I was correct in the
move, but I just applied the wrong entry strategy. I should have bought a retracement, instead of
trying to buy a fresh breakout.


That Day’s Weaknesses (If any) – This is where I write in if there were any weaknesses or
distractions on the day I placed the trade. For example if you are dead tired and place a trade,
then write in that you were very tired. Or if you place a trade when there were five people
coming and out of your trading office or room in your house, then write that in. If you placed the
trade when the fire alarm was going off then write that in. Or if you place a trade without having
done your daily habits, then write that in. Etc. Whatever you believe was a possible weakness
that threw you off your game.


That Day’s Strengths (If any) – Here you can write in what strengths you had during the day you
placed your trade. If you had complete peace and quiet, write that in. If you completed all your
daily habits, then write that in. Etc. Whatever you believe was a possible strength during the
day.


How many Open Positions Total (including the one you just placed) – How many open trades do
you have after placing this one? If you have zero open trades and you just placed one, then the
total number of open positions would be one, so write in “1.” If you have on three open trades,
and you are placing a new current one, then the total number of open positions would be four, so
write in “4.” The reason you have this column in your trading journal is so that you can notice
trends in winning and losing streaks. Do a lot of your losing streaks happen when you have on a
lot of open positions at the same time? Do you have a winning streak when the number of open
positions is kept low? Or can you handle a lot of open positions at the same time?


Exit Spread Cost (in pips) – This is optional if you want to keep track of your spread cost in pips.
If you executed a market order, how many pips did you pay in spread.


Exit Spread Cost (in dollars) – This is optional if you want to keep track of your spread cost in
dollars. If you executed a market order, how many dollars did you pay in spread.


Total Spread Cost (in pips) – You write in the total spread cost of the entry and exit in pips.


Total Spread Cost (in dollars) – You write in the total spread cost of the entry and exit in dollars.


Commission Cost – Here you write in the total commission cost that you incurred for getting in
and out of the trade. If you have a forex broker that is commission free and only gets
compensated through the spread, then you do not need this column.


Starting Balance – The starting account balance that you had prior to the placing of the trade


Interest/swap – If you hold forex currency pairs past the rollover, then you either get interest or
need to pay out interest depending on the rollover rates. Or if you bought a stock and got a
dividend then write that in. Or if you shorted a stock and you had to pay a dividend, then write
that in.


Ending Balance – The ending balance of your account after the trade is closed after taking into
account trade P&L, commission cost, and interest/swap.


Reasons for taking the trade – Here is where you go into much more detail about why you placed
the trade. Write out your thinking. Instead of writing a paragraph or two describing my thinking
behind the trade, I condense the reasons down into bullet points. It can be anywhere from 1-10
bullet points.


What I Learned – No matter if the trade is a win or loss, write down what you believed you
learned. Again, instead of writing out a paragraph or two, I condense it down into bullet points. it
can be anywhere from 1-10 bullet points. I do this during the day the trade closed as a profit or
loss.


What I learned after Long Term reflection, several days, weeks, or months – This is the very
interesting column. This is important because after you have a winning or losing trade, you will
not always know the true reasons why it happened. You have your immediate theories and
reasons which you include in the previous column. However, there are times when after several
days, weeks, or months, you find the true reason and proper market belief about why your trade
succeeded or failed. It can take a few days or weeks or months to reach that “aha” moment. I am
not saying that I am thinking about trades I placed ten months ago. I try to forget about them and
focus on the present moment. However, there will be trades where you have these nagging
questions about they failed or succeeded and you will only discover those reasons several days,
weeks, or months later. When you discover the reasons, you write them in this column.
submitted by Fox-The-Wise to Forex [link] [comments]

Rolled Over 401k to IRA with Trust Company, Started LLC, got IRA funds distributed to LLC

It's my money. I'll do what I want with it. But how to do this without making Uncle Sam mad and not taking a penalty for early withdraw? Found this avenue on accident when looking for a Forex broker.
Found a local trust company, explained to them I wanted to trade Forex (and possibly invest in more rental properties when that market takes a crap) and wanted to know how I could use my old 401k (403b) to accomplish this.
Here are the steps in crude form:
You CANNOT distribute any of this money to yourself (legally). Any brokerage accounts or real estate would have to be purchased under the LLC. Waiting on the distribution from the Trust to the LLC bank account as I type this.
You can also keep contributing to that IRA and passing it through to the LLC and claim tax deductions if you're eligible.
For now I plan on doing standard long term stock investing, possibly throw some at BTC, and invest in another rental property.
submitted by pepper167 to personalfinance [link] [comments]

Market Makers Tin Foil Hat

Came across couple threads on here about people discussing SL hunting Market Makers and quite a few said that all this is baloney... Since its Friday and I just finished analyzing the screws ups of the week, I decided to write a short post about the matter from my experience as my PERSONAL opinion.
To begin with, Stock Trading and Options communities have a general consensus that some kind of 'shady activities' occur. It's actually almost a mainstream idea, thanks to movies like Wolf of Wallstreet and people like Musky with his 'funding secured'. Along with countless other charged and non charged insider trading individuals and entities.
I imagine I don’t have to explain the ‘crypto’ market a place where they actually run ads to join a group and then pump and dump some shitty coin.
Anyway enough of other folks, lets move on to Forex. To cut it simply, Banks have already been caught red handed collaborating in chat rooms on how to manipulate the price to their advantage. (https://www.reuters.com/article/us-banks-forex-settlement-idUSKBN0O50CQ20150520)
So this should answer your question if there WAS Market Maker who moved markets.... Yes there was and its not some conspiracy theory, they've been found, charged, fined. Its up to you to decide if this is still going on or just stopped overnight.
Do these people SL hunt your individual positions? No, but what they do is seek liquidity... Chances are, you have placed SL after your usual textbook analysis at a major support/resistance as many other retailers... Experienced Whale traders at CITI, JP etc know where you have these SL. They also know where you most likely placed your pending buy/sell with tight SL. All they have to do is drive the price enough to take out all of the above and stopped out positions will fuel their direction... Combine that with creation of some 'other pattern' and you have bunch of other people jumping on the train going same directions as the institutional trader. Job done.
Now onto the Brokers.
From my experience, there is no such thing as a good Market Maker Broker... Yes there are absolute awful unregulated ones with dealing desk where you will most likely never withdraw any profits and some not so bad ones like Oanda, Forex without a dealing desk.
Ask how Oanda, Forex.com make their money... They will tell you its by spreads... Open up Oanda and check out average spreads and go to 'maximum' ... You will see some rather crazy spreads during news that if you ever traded on ECN would seem alien to you... Same goes to Rollover... Its up to you to decide if these things are just because Oanda and Gain have liquidity providers that are extremely in-flexible or.....
Lets not go far for a recent example, just open up EUUSD 1Minute chart of todays closing. ECN broker closed today at 1.6220 vs 1.6225 aka 0.5 pip spread and thats as high as the price went in last closing minutes... Spread did not jump anywhere much really - I was there to watch it.
Now lets open up Oanda chart on Tradingview... What do we see here? A spike to 1.16262 on last minute - now lets go and check Oandas maximum spread at this exact time, we find that it is exactly 6 pips.
Lets look at the chart again and think where a small time 'retail trader' that trades on small TF's would put their SL. Probably at 1.16254, 1.16282, 1.16293 area and lastly (same as me) 1.16323 area... Neither one of these would have been hit if you traded with ECN Broker... All of these with exception of last one (would be a really close call) would have been hit by Oanda or Forex.com today. Again its up to you to decide if this is just because Gain and Oanda have such 'interesting' liquidity providers or a broker that makes money on spreads is... you know... making money on spreads...
So here is my 2 cents... This again is my personal opinion.
submitted by Mozdar to Forex [link] [comments]

What am I missing? A (flawed) strategy on using interest rate differences and forex hedging?

I just can't figure out what's the catch. I must be missing something crucial, but I just don't see what.
Let's say I have savings in US dollars. (Alternatively, I can borrow USD at really low rates.)
Then, I can deposit money in a foreign bank account with insurance in a foreign currency. All legal and in solid banks.
Let's assume some currency of a developing country. High volatility, moderate to low political risks, high interest rates. (There are several such currencies I have in mind to diversify. I'm not talking about political risks at the moment, but I am aware of such.)
Let's say that such deposit would yield me 10% per year in that foreign currency.
The problem is of course the risk of that foreign currency losing value faster than the interest rate I'm getting paid in the currency.
If after the first year I get 10% more but that currency is devalued by 20% compared to USD, then I would end up with less dollars when converted back to US dollars.
To address that, I would simultaneously open a long position for USD/XXX with a forex broker (I would in effect sell back that XXX currency and buy USD, for as long as the position remains open.)
So, I would take US dollars, convert them to currency XXX, deposit at a foreign bank at high interest rate.
At the same time, I would go long for the same amount (notationally) of XXX. I would use little leverage to make sure I don't get a margin call. Part of the available US dollar savings would be used for that.
The lot size of USD/XXX would match what I would deposit in a foreign bank in XXX.
If XXX goes up compared to USD, then my long position loses me money, but I make it back when converting that foreign deposit back to USD.
If XXX goes down, then my bank deposit would be worth less, but I would make money on my long position.
There is roll cost and conversion spread (both for the trade and for the deposit) and there are political risks and there is still a risk of a margin call, if leverage is greater than one.
But theoretically, I could even do with without leverage.
If I have, say, $200k. Then I would set aside $100k (plus the maintenance) for the forex broker. And would open a lot for that amount (minus the maintenance), and would convert a matching amount to XXX and then would deposit XXX.
The way I look at it, I would effectively be getting 10% interest in USD. Well, that would be 10% minus the associated costs. But the costs could still be less than 10%.
And risks as really limited only to political risks. I wouldn't invest in a country that's at war. But there are plenty of developing countries that pay 10%+ on deposits in their currencies.
But must be missing something. It can't be that simple.
So what am I missing?
Would the rollover completely kill any profit margin?
submitted by Aero72 to investing [link] [comments]

InstaForex Review: Not That Good of a Broker Can I trade Forex without a broker? - YouTube BEST LOW DEPOSIT FOREX BROKERS IN 2020! - YouTube How To Find The BEST Forex Broker - YouTube The ONLY Forex Trading Video You Will EVER Need - YouTube What is Rollover, why is it important, and... (Old Version) 101. How Rollover Works in Forex Trading

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InstaForex Review: Not That Good of a Broker

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